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What is Cloud Computing?

Cloud computing is essentially a group of computers (servers) and other compute resources managed by a third party (AWS, Microsoft, Google) in a data center somewhere.  One important characteristic of the leading cloud providers is the ability to quickly and frictionlessly provision resources.

The cloud computing model is one that offers computing services such as compute, storage, databases, networking, software, machine learning, and analytics over the internet and on demand. 

Cloud Computing has quickly gained popularity for its ability to easily provision and manage resources. Before cloud computing, it was required that businesses setup, provision, and manage their own data centers. You can use AWS to run a virtual server for a couple dollars a months, but for the same hardware to be provisioned and managed privately can cost significantly more.

So how does this all work? Cloud computing uses a process called virtualization. Virtualization is the process of running multiple virtual instances on top of a physical computer system using an abstract layer sitting on top of actual hardware.  A hypervisor is a computing layer that enables multiple operating systems to execute in the same physical compute resource. These operating systems running on top of these hypervisors are VMs – a component that can emulate a complete computing environment using only software but as if it was running on bare metal. Hypervisors, also known as Virtual Machine Monitors ( VMMs ), manage these VMs while running side by side. A hypervisor creates a logical separation between VMs, and it provides each of them with a slice of the available compute, memory, and storage resources. 

What is Cloud Computing?

Cloud computing is essentially a group of computers (servers) and other compute resources managed by a third party (AWS, Microsoft, Google) in a data center somewhere. 

What is Virtualization?

Cloud computing is essentially a group of computers (servers) and other compute resources managed by a third party (AWS, Microsoft, Google) in a data center somewhere.